Identifying your Carers

As a conscientious employer you will want to identify the carers within your workforce to ensure they are getting all of the emotional and practical support that they need to continue working, alongside caring responsibilities. Having to give up work not only affects an employee’s financial situation but their self-esteem and general well-being and for most would not be a first choice option. Losing your valued employees who may have caring responsibilities means a loss of key and experienced employees resulting in expensive recruitment and retraining costs as well as a loss of expertise and knowledge.

1 in 5 carers have to give up work – we help carers stay in work.

Talking about caring often becomes a taboo subject within the workplace and because of that, employees often experience feelings of isolation and struggle to express their concerns to managers and colleagues. Caring responsibilities which, grow over time can also mean that individuals do not immediately recognise they have become a ‘carer’. We understand that all of these contributing factors can make it hard for you to identify who your carers are.

Below are a few statistics that may help you to begin understanding the difficulties your working carers are facing.

How do your Carers feel in the workplace?

0%
Working carers have felt lonely or isolated in the workplace as a result of their caring responsibilities
0%
Of working carers felt that colleagues and managers did not understand the impact of caring and 38% had not felt comfortable talking about their caring responsibilities at work
0%
Said they would be less stressed if these issues were addressed and six in ten (60%) said that they would feel that someone understood their situation
0%
Of the carers who had given up work to care highlighted the stress of juggling work and care and a third (34%) the lack of suitable care services

Statistic taken from Carers UK and Employers for Carers – Caring and isolation in the workplace report. This study was undertaken between December 2014 and February 2015

What kind of care do they provide?

87%

Provide emotional support, motivation or keeping an eye on someone either in person or by phone

85%

Said they arranged or co-ordinated care services or medical appointments

83%

Said they manage paperwork or financial matters for the person they care for

Who do they care for?

0%
Carers care for their parents or parents-in-law
0%
Over a quarter care for their spouse or partner
0%
People caring for disabled children under 18
0%
Care for their grandparents and 7% care for another relative
0%
Care for a friend or neighbour

Statistic taken from Carers UK and Employers for Carers – Caring and isolation in the workplace report. This study was undertaken between December 2014 and February 2015

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